Monday, January 11, 2016

What I Should Have Done


Moving along with my One Monthly Goal of machine embroidery quilting this bed runner I laid out the templates on the corner and end to determine the placement of the designs. I marked the center line of the border on the fabric with a chalk marker and lined up the template center lines with that mark. Then I hooped up that corner and started stitching. I'll bet you can see the problem from this picture but I didn't see it until the corners were stitched - all four of them!
That's right, all but one of the corners came out too high for the rest of the design. You can clearly see it from the crosshatch chalk marks in this picture. 
The design from the back. There's a little bit of show through from the top thread and a couple of threads that need to be snipped but all in all, not bad. 
The first two corners were not a complete success but I did get better as I went along. Here's what I learned. DON'T quilt the corners first! I think I should have started on the long sides first because the true center line runs off those sides. DO look at all four dimensions when hooping not just right/left but diagonals when hooping corners. This is where I slipped up and it bit me in the butt.
I won't be ripping this out, I'm moving along. This is a learning piece for me and I'm learning A LOT! Besides, in the past my need for perfection has stopped me from completing projects and I'm moving past self criticism in order to learn and grow.

Linking up to Design Wall Monday at Patchwork Times. Thanks to Miss Judy for continuing this fun quilter's tradition which has kept so many of us connected through the years even though she is not so much into quilting these days.

Until next time,

11 comments:

  1. I have such a difficult time trying to machine quilt my projects. What did you put your design on?

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    1. So this quilting is going on a rescued project I'm turning into a bed runner. Trying to keep my experiments to low risk projects.

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  2. Very wise choice to just move on. I would like to try using my machine embroidery unit for quilting. I have many designs just need to find the right project.

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    1. I recommend that you start out with a project that is low risk for you to avoid frustration and disappointment. With that being said I have learned a lot and feel better and better about about this project.

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  3. Glad you pushed on, and kept going, despite the things you learned along the way. I am a perfectionist too, and am learning to allow the process to teach me.
    Love it.
    xo Kris

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    1. Boy this is probably the supreme lesson of my life and maybe the next life too! Thanks for the bread flour tip because so far my bread machine bread has come like lovely door stops! I can make a really good regular loaf of bread but I MUST conquer this technology. Here we go again woman over machine!

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  4. Hi again Pat. Had to come by to say, yes, yes, yes,,,,do use bread flour in your machine! I prefer King Arthur's, but there are many good brands available. It really does make all the difference!! And the freshest of yeast is important too.
    Happy baking!
    xo Kris

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  5. Great lesson learning. I don't know how many quilt blocks or quilt I either started over or just quit. I finally stop trying to be perfect. The funny thing was I was the only one who saw the mistakes. Everyone else saw a beautiful block or quilt. We can sometimes be our own worse enemy.

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    1. Michelle you are so right and this is a lesson I must keep re-learning. Perfection is the enemy of creativity! I need to tattoo that phrase on the inside of my eyelids!!

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  6. You'll just have to reframe your description to "design decision" instead of mistake! ;)

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    1. Well then Annie I have some crazy ass "design decisions" going on in most of my projects - just saying!

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Thanks for your comments. I love hearing what you have to say.