Wednesday, July 1, 2015

Making Yogurt At Home Even Easier

As I told you in this post, Making Yogurt from 2012 I've been making my own yogurt for more than 30 years.  I've always been something of a whole foods/back to nature kinda gal and when I had a family of three growing boys to feed we went through a lot of yogurt. It would be nothing to make two or three quarts a week using a rather laborious method involving the pilot light of my gas oven and overnight incubation in a water bath. With just Chris and me at home we probably eat about one quart a week and about half a quart of keifer per week in our smoothies.
 Here's my new toy. A Yogourmet electric yogurt maker. Instead of the seven small jars my old yogurt maker used it comes with a two quart plastic container. That's it on the left. That would probably be too much for us to make at one time but it would be ideal for a larger family. Instead of the two quart container I use a one quart mason jar - perfect for us.
The Yogourmet holds the yogurt at the perfect incubation temperature in a water bath until it's the thickness you like. The longer you incubate the thicker and tangier the yogurt will be. There's a recipe booklet that comes with it that explains the whole process and tons of web pages too for you to reference as well as my page. I got mine on Amazon for about $50, at that price it will pay for itself in no time. (I have no financial interest in this product. I'm just telling you what works for me.) 

The best yogurt making tip I ever got was not to use too much starter. One or two tablespoons of starter yogurt per batch is all you need. If you use too much you probably won't have enough milk for the good stuff to eat up and your yogurt will be runny/soupy instead of thick. Let me know if you make yogurt at home and what works for you.

Until next time,

10 comments:

  1. I make yogurt, too.And I also gave up on the little jars, and even gave up on a yogurt maker. I just sit the quart jar on a heating pad set to low and wrap a towel around the whole set-up. I will try using less starter as you recommend. Thanks for the tip!

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    1. The heating pad is certainly the most minimalist way to go and isn't it amazing that we can get results with almost any method? I try to tell folks how easy this is and how much money they can save all the time.

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  2. I used to make yogurt too----but have gotten so lazy in my old age! That is a neat yogurt maker, and I like the idea of using the one quart mason jar. Just this past week I deliberately counted how many varieties of yogurt there are at our grocery store. Organic, greek, non-organic, plain, non-plain, fruit at the bottom, blended with fruit. etc. I came up with about 56 varieties! and I'm sure I missed some. New brands and varieties appear all the time with the most interesting names. I'm tempted with your yogurt maker purchase.

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    1. It's amazing how many types and varieties they've come up with isn't it? My main objective is to stay away from additives and sugars and to be as close to whole foods as possible without being a fanatic and this is a small thing I can do to achieve that goal. We just add fresh fruit and maybe a tsp. of honey and we're good to go. You do have to get used to the different taste and texture of homemade - more tart and not as firm but once you do there's no going back.

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  3. I have never even thought of making my own yogurt but we eat A LOT of it every week. This is very interesting, Patrica. I'll have to see what my hubby thinks, I bet he goes for it.

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    1. Jeanna, you would save so much money it's ridiculous! You do have to get used to a more tart taste (no sugar you know) and a slightly less firm product. We add fresh fruit and a small amount of honey or agave. I use this stuff in smoothies too and since it's so easy to make I can add it to baked goods or salad dressing because I can always make more!

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  4. Oh you brought memories back of my aunt making homemade yogurt...it was soooo good!!!

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    1. Homemade yogurt does taste different. I think it's an acquired taste because we are so used to all the sugar that's in store bought these days and homemade is definitely more tart but we like it.

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  5. We had friends from India who always made their own yogurt. You make it sound so fun Patrica! And I bet it it a lot healthier too. I'll have to show Jim your post. It's just the two of us at home now too.

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  6. Hi there! What a fun a new toy is! When my husband was in college, back in the dark ages, I remember he had to make yogurt for a micro biology class. I am sure there is a much easier way now!!
    Oh yes indeedy, I have caught the embroidery bug!!
    XO Kris

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Thanks for your comments. I love hearing what you have to say.